Quick Answer: Could Would Grammar?

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What is the rule for to and too?

To is a preposition with several meanings, including “toward” and “until.” Too is an adverb that can mean “excessively” or “also.” Just to be clear: two is pronounced the same as to and too, but it can’t be used instead of either of them because it’s a number.

Can could may grammar?

When we talk about possibility, we use can, could and may, but they are different in meaning. It can be dangerous to cycle in the city. This expresses what the speaker believes is a general truth or known fact, or a strong possibility. It could/may be dangerous to cycle in the city.

Can V could?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Would usage in sentence?

Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. … We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense.

Which is or that is?

The clause that comes after the word “which” or “that” is the determining factor in deciding which one to use. If the clause is absolutely pertinent to the meaning of the sentence, you use “that.” If you could drop the clause and leave the meaning of the sentence intact, use “which.”

Would you or could you?

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can). And according to the American Heritage Dictionary, “would” is used to make a polite request.

Should could Would grammar?

English grammar help: how to use ‘should’, ‘would’ and ‘could’ ‘Should’, ‘would’ and ‘could’ are auxiliary verbs that can sometimes get confusing. They are the past tense of ‘shall’, ‘will’ and ‘can’ but are also used in other situations.

Can you or could you grammar?

If taken literally, “Can you” is equivalent to asking the person if they’re capable of doing something. “Could you”, on the other hand, implies that the action can be completed under some circumstances by the person. The usage of can you is idiomatic, and hence, is more popular used phrase of the two.

How can I use could in a sentence?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.” Examples: Extreme rain could cause the river to flood the city.

Is onto correct grammar?

The preposition onto meaning ‘to a position on the surface of’ has been widely written as one word (instead of on to) since the early 18th century, as in the following sentences: He threw his plate onto the floor. … Remember, though, that you should never write on to as one word when it means ‘onwards and towards’.

Can you or will you?

May implies that you are asking for permission. Can implies that you are questioning somebody’s ability. Will implies that you are seeking an answer about the future.